VeloCittà, the International  Platform for Cities & Bike Share

Second International Conference on Bike Sharing

On November 16, 2017, VeloCittà, in conjunction with ISINNOVA and Comune di Roma, held its 2nd international conference on bike sharing. The event took place in the Protomoteca Room of the sixteenth-century Campidoglio, with more than 120 participants from 20 different countries.

The day opened with welcome remarks from Virginia Raggi, Mayor of Rome, Joep Wijnands, Ambassador of the Netherlands in Italy, Enrico Stefàno, President of Rome’s Mobility Commission, Linda Meleo, Rome’s Mobility Councillor, and Mario Gualdi of ISINNOVA, after which an orange bike was presented to Mayor Raggi from Ambassador Wijnands. The Mayor of Paris’s 12thArrondissement and President of Autolib Vélib Métropole, Catherine Baratti-Elbaz, Chris Paul of Greater Manchester Mayor’s Cycling and Walking Team, and Paolo Gandolfi, a Member of the Italian Parliament, then spoke about their experiences and offered some input on what kind of policies and initiatives will make Rome a more cycling-friendly city.

After lunch, other European experiences were presented by Silvia Jiménez Valenciano of the City of Barcelona and Florinda Boschetti of POLIS, the European Network of Cities. Then the bike share operators attending the event had a chance to talk about their systems, their networks, their business models and revenue streams. They discussed different ways to address bike sharing challenges, and showed how Rome could successfully implement a bike sharing programme that would include options such as geo-fencing, the favoured model of VeloCittà, and digital parking stations.

The next hour was devoted to a series of round table discussions, where each operator had a chance to go around to several tables of 10-15 people each to explain their services and to answer any questions they had. This led to a number of lively discussions, particularly between competing operators, interrupted only so that the organisers could formally close the conference. The participants then continued comparing ideas about bike sharing as they made their way towards the exit, leaving their new Roman friends with a palpable sense of optimism about their city’s transport.

Read the day’s agenda

All the presentations and pictures are available here.

Team VeloCittà is now taking the platform forwards in a sequence of conferences, workshops and position papers. Already available the first position paper on Bike Sharing Networks and Model Bid for the 3rd Conference.

The results of the original European VeloCittà project, showcasing all activities, results and lessons can be downloaded here.

VeloCittá‘s 10 Golden Rules for Municipalities on Bike Share Systems can be found here.

Read about the first European bike-sharing conference

Results for:

Burgos
Spain
Szeged
Hungary
Padua
Italy
Krakow
Poland
Borough of Southwark
UK
Borough of Lambeth
UK
Wednesday 15th November 2017

New bike-share data feed will get more bums on saddles, say operators

"Big data" from London’s Santander Cycles and New York’s Citi Bike has been made commercially available by Ito World. The Cambridge and London data visualisation specialist has also included other global bike-share schemes into the same real-time data feed. The feed includes the locations of the bikes and docking stations in real-time. Providers of mobility solutions – such as multi-modal smartphone apps – can now more easily incorporate bike-share data. Nice Ride Minnesota's IT director Mitch Vars said: “Bike sharing has matured in recent years from something experimental to a key component of urban transportation in much of the world. Cooperation between companies like Ito World and the public and private operators of these systems is accelerating the adoption of bike sharing by new users." Read on here.
Monday 06th November 2017

Why we can’t have nice things: dockless bikes and the tragedy of the commons

Behind this bucolic industry is a multibillion-dollar battle between China’s big tech companies and Silicon Valley, and the nightmare of vandals and parking. If there is one sad fact that technology has taught us, it’s maybe that we just can’t have nice things. Now Washington DC has become the latest testing ground for what happens when technology and good intentions meet the real world. Brightly coloured bikes began popping up around the US capital in September like little adverts for a better world. On a recent trip two lemon yellow bikes were propped up in the autumn sun by the carousel on the Mall. A pair of lime green bikes added a splash of colour to a grey corner of DuPont Circle. An orange and silver bike waited excitedly for its rider outside the George Washington University Hospital. The untethered bikes all belong to a new generation of “dockless” bike share companies. To pick one up users download an app that shows where the bikes have been left. Scan a QR code on your phone, the bike unlocks and you are off for a $1 30-minute carbon-free ride. Unlike docking rental services, which require bikes to be returned to a fixed docking station, you can leave your ride wherever your journey ends, practically. And therein lies the problem. Read more here.

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