VeloCittà is a project using segmentation techniques and adoption of the most effective operational solutions to improve usage of Bicycle Share Systems

The ultimate benefit of VeloCittà is that it provides inspiration and builds capacity in local authorities and BSS stakeholders engaged with the design and implementation of effective and resource-efficient solutions able to boost the uptake of BSS’s, setting in motion a beneficial snowball effect on urban cycling as a whole. The project will see its results continued in the ‘Cycling Workspace’ long after the project has finished.

Visit the cycling workspace
Burgos
Burgos
Spain
Szeged
Szeged
Hungary
Padua
Padua
Italy
Krakow
Krakow
Poland
santander cycle
Borough of Southwark
UK
Sant1
Borough of Lambeth
UK
Monday 23rd May 2016
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BIKESHARING AND BICYCLE SAFETY

The growth of bikesharing in the United States has had a transformative impact on urban transportation. Major cities have established large bikesharing systems, including Boston, Chicago, Denver, Minneapolis-Saint Paul, New York City, Salt Lake City, the San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle, Washington DC, and others. These systems began operating as early as 2010, and no fatalities have occurred within the US as of this writing. However, three have happened in North America—two in Canada and one in Mexico. Bikesharing has some qualities that appear inherently unsafe for bicyclists. Most prominently, helmet usage is documented to be quite low in most regions. In addition, bikesharing is also used by people who bicycle less frequently, and by tourists, who are often less familiar with the local terrain. In this study, researchers take a closer look at bikesharing safety from qualitative and quantitative perspectives. Through a series of four focus groups, they discussed bikesharing usage and safety with bikesharing members and nonmembers in the Bay Area. They further engaged experts nationwide from a variety of fields to evaluate their opinions and perspectives on bikesharing and safety. Finally, researchers conducted an analysis of bicycle and bikesharing activity data, as well as bicycle and bikesharing collisions to evaluate injury rates associated with bikesharing when compared with benchmarks of personal bicycling. The data analysis found that collision and injury rates for bikesharing are lower than previously computed rates for personal bicycling. Experts and focus group participants independently pointed to bikesharing rider behavior and bikesharing bicycle design as possible factors. In particular, bikesharing bicycles are generally designed in ways that promote stability and limited speeds, which mitigate the conditions that contribute to collisions. Data analysis also explored whether there was evidence of a “safety in numbers benefit” that resulted from bikesharing activity. However, no significant impact from bikesharing activity on broader bicycle collisions could be found within the regions in which they operate. Discussion and recommendations are presented in the conclusion. Read more here.
Monday 23rd May 2016
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The Uphill Push to Save a Bike-Share Pioneer

Aboard a ship on the Indian Ocean, he heard that the bike-sharing company, which is now known as PBSC Urban Solutions, was available for purchase. From a satellite phone, he bid about $4 million in cash to buy the company out of bankruptcy. He did this without hiring lawyers and accountants to scour the books. “I’m not very rich, but I’m not a poor person,” said Mr. Rodi, a multimillionaire who also owns a Canadian furniture company and whose name is synonymous with sofas in Quebec. “So when this came on the market I said, ‘Well, that’s interesting.' ” He quickly learned why due diligence matters. The core of the international business was sound, even profitable by Mr. Rodi’s assertion, although he would not go into the financial specifics of the private company. As Mr. Rodi likes to say, it is the “Rolls-Royce of bike-share systems,” with sturdy equipment and solar-powered Wi-Fi docking stations. But the company, which was started by the city of Montreal, was starved for capital and crippled by a disastrous decision to change software systems. Bankruptcy only added to its woes, as the company faced shortages of parts and products and as rivals snatched up top customers, like the new Seattle bike-share system. The industry, in the meantime, has evolved. Once a curiosity favored by politicians to improve their environmental credentials, bike sharing has increasingly become an accepted piece of transit infrastructure. Major cities with established systems are expanding them, while communities outside Europe and North America are turning to bike sharing as a partial answer to urban gridlock. Read more here.

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